I recently discovered how easy it is to make Latte di Mandorle (almond milk) at home.  I think of this not so much as a milk substitute, but as something completely different, although still a tasty, creamy beverage.

I soaked three cups of almonds overnight in water.  Afterwards the skins slip off easily- some recipes called for them to be removed, but I them intact.  I rinsed and drained the almonds, then blended each cup of almonds with with three cups of fresh water.

I used a “nut milk bag”to drain the almond milk from the solids.  At this

point, after soaking the almonds the whole process took about 10 minutes- it couldn’t be easier.  I added a bit of agave syrup at the end to highlight the nutty almond flavor and sweeten the milk a bit- some recipes called for dates or apple slices to be added during the blending process, which would have accomplished the same result.

The by-product of the almond milk is technically a coarse, wet, almond meal.  You can dry this in the oven and use it as a flour substitute for baking, or add it to smoothies or shakes as is.

For the original recipe I used as a guide, click here.

After tasting home-made almond milk, the commercial stuff won’t ever cut it for me again. Even the best, most natural brands are metallic by comparison, and a bit too sweet.  My version was delicate, perfumed and super creamy.

Next question… how to best use this in a cocktail!?

Almond Milk White Russians?

About The Author

I love all things Italian: the beautiful country of Italia, the Italians themselves, the language, the food… and above all, I love Italian wine. The people I meet in my charmed life are fascinating, the wines are extraordinary. I needed a special place like this to write about them, and to remember them.

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